Covid-19: More than 10% of all Irish deaths occurred in last week of January

ireland
Covid-19: More Than 10% Of All Irish Deaths Occurred In Last Week Of January Covid-19: More Than 10% Of All Irish Deaths Occurred In Last Week Of January
More than 250 people have died with the virus in each of the last three weeks. Photo: PA Archive.
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More than 10 per cent of all deaths in Ireland related to Covid-19 occurred in the last week of January, new data from the Central Statistics Office (CSO) shows.

Some 317 people died due to the disease in the week ending January 29th, bringing the total number of deaths reported in Ireland since the start of the pandemic to 3,054.

There were 109 deaths in Dublin in the week ending January 29th, while Cork (36) and Limerick (28) were the only other counties to record more than 20 deaths in the week.

Basing data on the actual date of death rather than the day of reporting, the CSO found that more than 250 people have died with the virus in each of the last three weeks.

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Its latest analysis of Covid-19 cases and deaths from February 2020 to January 2021 found that Ireland’s overall mortality rate is 16 deaths per 1,000 confirmed cases.

This mortality rate was highest in April 2020, at 77 deaths per 1,000 confirmed cases. In January 2021, the mortality rate was 13 deaths per 1,000 cases.

64 per cent of all confirmed Covid-19 deaths to date have occurred among those aged 80 or older.

Underlying conditions

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 2,504 deaths of people with underlying conditions from 28,326 confirmed cases with underlying conditions.

There were 2,320 deaths of people with underlying conditions in the over 65 age group, while the median age of those who died with underlying conditions was 83 years old.

Of the 222 deaths that have occurred in Ireland in the 25 to 64 age group, 183 had underlying conditions.

One notable condition, chronic heart disease, was present in 42 per cent of deaths.

The CSO says the number of cases with underlying conditions in recent weeks is likely to be underestimated, due to the third wave’s surge of infection meaning underlying conditions were unknown in a large volume of deaths and cases.

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