GAA: Cavan top off historic weekend with Ulster title win

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Cavan players celebrate their Ulster title win over Donegal. Photo: INPHO/Morgan Treacy.
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Muireann Duffy

It has been a weekend of GAA action that has seen emotions run high with some unexpected turns.

One hundred years on from the events of Bloody Sunday on November 21st, which saw 14 people killed in Croke Park during a football match between Tipperary and Dublin, both teams competed for their respective provincial titles.

Getting things underway on Saturday, Galway earned a dramatic win over Tipperary in the first All-Ireland quarter-final of the day, while Waterford also nabbed a spot in the semi-finals with a win over Clare.

Football took over in the evening, as Dublin surged to a relentless win against Meath in the Leinster football final.

Sunday action

Both the Munster and Ulster football titles were decided today.

Topping off the evening's action, Cavan pried the Ulster title away from Donegal in an unexpected turn of events.

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Point scoring left both teams neck and neck for most of the game, before a goal from Conor Madden scored during stoppage-time sealed the deal for Cavan.

Final result: Cavan: 1-13 | Donegal: 0-12

Cork welcomed Tipperary to Páirc Uí Chaoimh earlier this afternoon, with the Premier county wearing replica 1920, white and green jersey's to mark the 100th anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

The Rebels have been the talking point of the Munster championship after a shock win over reigning champs Kerry in the semi-final.

In the end Tipperary honoured the memory of Michael Hogan in style with their first Munster SFC title in 85 years.

Final result: Tipperary 0-17 | Cork 0-14

In Sunday's hurling, Donegal beat Mayo in the Nickey Rackard Cup final at Croke Park.

Final result: Donegal 3-18 | Mayo 0-21

In the afternoon, Kildare secured the Christy Ring Cup in their meeting against Down, also at the GAA's HQ.

Final result: Kildare 3-16 | Down 0-22

Saturday's results

Getting the weekend underway on Saturday, Galway hoped to recover from their tough defeat to Kilkenny last weekend in the Leinster hurling final.

The Tribesmen faced the task of Tipperary in the first All-Ireland quarter-final of the day, which was set for the Gaelic Grounds at 1.15pm and televised on RTÉ.

Aidan Harte was Galway’s unlikely hero, as his late goal proved the key score that earned the side a dramatic win over Tipperary.

Final result: Galway 3-23 | Tipperary 2-24

Next up was Waterford and Clare, who were also planning to nab a spot in the All-Ireland semi-finals.

Coming off the back of a loss to Limerick in the Munster hurling final last weekend, Waterford were not as downtrodden as might be expected, with just four points separating them from John Kiely's charges at the final whistle.

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The score at today's final whistle bore this out, as the side held out over Clare to finish with a comfortable nine point lead.

In comparison, Clare lost on a scoreline of 0-36 to 1-23 when they met the Shannonsiders in the Munster quarter-final back in October.

The Banner's win over Wexford last weekend had provided a much-needed confidence boost for Brian Lohan's side, but had further cemented the argument of their reliance on Tony Kelly who claimed 1-15 of their 1-21 tally last Saturday.

Final result: Waterford 3-27 (36) | Clare 3-18 (27)

In the evening, football took over as Dublin and Meath met in the Leinster football final.

The Royals put in an immense second half performance to see themselves through their semi-final against Kildare last Sunday, rocketing five goals past Mark Donnellan to book their place in the final.

However, such goal opportunities did not readily present themselves against Dublin, and the Dubs' 2-23 to 0-7 win over Laois last weekend did not do the 2019 All-Ireland winners any harm.

This evening saw Dublin emerge with a large lead over Meath - the final nail being a last minute goal from Niall Scully, scored during three minutes of added time.

Final result: Dublin 3-21 | Meath 0-9

2020 has been a historic year for the GAA.

Covid-19 left no stone unturned over the past nine months, throwing every facet of life into disarray and putting a lock on the gate of sports grounds around Ireland and the world.

A rewriting of the club and inter-county championship seasons, and games without fans have made for a very different year of sport, but it has also given the GAA the opportunity to mark the anniversary of one of its darkest days in the most fitting way possible.

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