Avengers: Infinity War – a round-up of reviews

Reviews for the Avengers sequel Infinity War are in.

The Marvel Studios superhero film is directed by the Russo brothers, Anthony and Joe.

Starring Robert Downey Jr, Chris Evans and others, it has received mostly positive reviews from critics.

Vulture’s David Edelstein wrote that “Marvel has done it again — only bigger.”

Chris Hemsworth arrives for the film’s world premiere (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

He added: “Avengers: Infinity War is going to dazzle, stagger, and rile people up … Flagrantly, bombastically extravagant, it plays its audience like a hundred million fiddles.”

Variety’s Owen Gleiberman wrote that the movie is a “sleekly witty action opera that’s at once overstuffed and bedazzling…

“Infinity War is a brashly entertaining jamboree, structured to show off each hero or heroine and give them just enough to do, and to update their mythologies without making it all feel like homework.

“At the same time, you may begin to lose hold of what made each of these characters, you know, special,” he wrote.

The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw wrote that “the film delivers the sugar-rush of spectacle and some very amusing one-liners.”

Benedict Cumberbatch attending the Avengers: Infinity War UK Fan Event (Matt Crossick/PA)

He added: “It’s just a supremely watchable film, utterly confident in its self-created malleable mythology. And confident also in the note of apocalyptic darkness.”

But The Telegraph’s Tim Robey said: “Organisationally, the movie has a struggle on its hands not to seem like the contents of a toy chest simply chucked down the stairs, with all the chaos of limbs and accessories that implies.”

He added: “The exorbitant action scenes hit all the necessary crowd-pleasing buttons at regular intervals, but for a movie with infinite potential… it’s possible to feel they banked on a rather narrow algorithm.”

The Press Association’s Damon Smith gave the film seven out of 10, writing that “a spry script affords the biggest personalities sufficient room to scene-steal and relegates other characters to just a couple of lines of dialogue.

“Perhaps their time to shine will dawn in the concluding chapter,” due for release in 2019 and also directed by the Russo brothers, he added.

And the New York Times’ AO Scott wrote that “the noisy, bloated spectacles of combat were surely the most expensive parts of the movie, but the money seems less like an imaginative tool than a substitute for genuine imagination.”

But Metro’s Sarah Deen wrote that “there was the usual Marvel bombast – sweeping fight scenes, stuff getting blown to kingdom come, and balls-out one-liners – but Infinity War was so much more than a popcorn movie. This is a film about sacrifice, grief and genocide.”

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