Budget 2018 will be greeted with indifference - Fianna Fáil

Budget 2018 will be greeted with indifference by the public, according to Fianna Fáil, who claim it benefited from their influence on Fine Gael.

The highlights include more teachers, doctors and gardaí. An increase in commercial stamp duty, small USC cuts and €5 extra in social welfare payments were also announced.

Fianna Fáil's enterprise spokesman Niall Collins says the only criticism is coming from Sinn Féin.

Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe said the supply and confidence agreement worked for Budget 2018 and he believes Fianna Fáil will support another Fine Gael budget this time next year.

Paschal Donohoe making his Budget speech.

The Minister was reacting to Sinn Féin criticism that the budget is a sham between the two parties.

He feels there's no need for an election next year.

"I had very extensive negotiations not only with every single one of my government colleagues but also with Fianna Fáil," said Mr Donohoe.

"Deputies McGrath and Calleary were very tough proponents on behalf of their party, but I was too on behalf of the Government. And I believe we will see the passage of a third budget. "

Meanwhile, USC reductions in the budget will give those on higher pay five times the benefit received by people on lower salaries according to a finding contained in a budget analysis from Social Justice Ireland.

The think tank says a single person earning €25,000 gains €65 per annum while a single person on €75,000 gains almost €328.

Sean Healy of Social Justice Ireland says Budget 2018 sees modest improvements but lacks ambition.

"Irish people today are facing grave and persistent challenges in homelessness, in poverty and across a whole range of other issues," he said.

"What we go in response is a budget that is focused on low tax, low investment and low ambition."

The budget will be questioned further by party leaders in the Dáil this morning.

READ MORE: A budget of modest payback: #Budget18 at a glance


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